Netflix Scores Deal With Time Warner/Warner Bros.

More television shows are coming to Netflix. On Monday the company announced that it has come to terms on a distribution agreement with Time Warner, parent company of Warner Bros. The new deal will see several shows that debuted in the 2012 fall season available for streaming through the service. These include shows like “Revolution,” “666 Park Avenue,” and even the upcoming “The Following” which will be airing on FOX.

Netflix-Time-WarnerAnalysts believe the deal is worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and depending on how long each of the shows included remains on the air–that figure may be increasing dramatically. The agreement is just the latest in a series of partnerships with content partners. Netflix is also focusing on several original content productions in addition to trying to acquire everything under the sun/

The news comes after video-streaming competitor Amazon signed a new deal with A+E Networks to stream several shows that is produces, including “Pawn Stars” and “Storage Wars.” Both Netflix and Amazon have said they are committed to spend mere billions of dollars to get digital streaming rights over the next several years–however, investors are asking if those investments are going to be paying big dividends in the next decade.

“You don’t want to be the guy who spent so much, only to find that you don’t have enough content,” said Tony Wible from Janney Montgomery Scott. “In an ironic twist, it makes you want to spend even more money.” In late December Netflix scored a big-time deal with The Walt Disney Company that is reportedly worth more than $300 million per year. The partnership means Netflix will receiving streaming rights for Disney’s catalog of movies.

2 Responses to “Netflix Scores Deal With Time Warner/Warner Bros.”

  1. [...] news comes shortly after Netflix announced that it would be partnering up with Time Warner to bring popular Warner Bros produces television shows to the streaming service. Those shows [...]

  2. [...] back as the 1920s, and covers content that is ‘unavailable’ through the company’s external licencing agreements (with the likes of Amazon, Netflix, and Redbox [...]

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