Google Go OnLive With Connected Gaming And Fiber Launches

Cloud gaming platform OnLive has been realased to Google TV users, after American rights holders to the platform LG agreed to allow their sets carrying Google TV platforms the right to promote and offer the service.

While free to download through an over-air update, the OnLive service (which is currently available to use in the USA, Belgium, Luxembourg, and the UK region) does require an applicable wireless controller for $50 (£31), with the game purchases also costing extra, though users will gain access to a range of high-end titles including Darksiders 2 and Sleeping Dogs, amongst others from the platform’s range of gaming content partners.

OnLive’s chairman Gary Lauder noted of the new sub-licenced platform for their serviceL “Our partnership with LG has enabled us to take an important step forward in making high-end gaming accessible to everyone, across a variety of consumer electronic devices.”

LG executive Georg Rasinski added: “We are proud to be working with OnLive to deliver an incredible home entertainment experience with a full range of interactive viewing and gaming possibilities on LG G2 Series TVs.”

Meanwhile, Google are also in the headlines this week for their launch of the ‘Google Fiber’ broadband service in the Kansas City (USA) metropolitan area, with the experimental ultra-high-speed structure being offered to potential users in the form of (at its peak) a combined collection of internet (1GB per second), TV (an estimated 100+ channels and a 2TB DVR storage (capable of recording up to 8 simultaneous programmes)), and cloud storage (1TB maximum), amongst other features (including relevant hardware for TV viewing and a Nexus 7 tablet computer) in a $120-per-month package.

The other, more budget-friendly, options available are a broadband and storage-only option ($70-per-month), and a ‘free’ industry average internet connection service (up to 5MB per second with a one-time $300 installation).

Google’s ‘chief financial officer’ Patrick Pitchette said of the launch: “Access is the next frontier that needs to be opened. We’re going to do it profitably. That is our plan. We are at a crossroad [at ‘levelled’ peak broadband speeds which Google believe have remained the same since 2000]. We at Google we believe there is no need to wait. The phone [not included on the package] is really a 1940’s thing. Why have a landline? It’s sitting there, you use it once every two weeks.”

While not quite the ‘complete’ set that a telecommunications company would normally offer, will Google Fiber’s unique offering managed to eventually make a breakthrough in Kansas City and the American market as a whole?

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