Apple Form Almost Half Of 2012 Trade-Ins

Statistics released for the year 2012 by ‘recycling comparison website’ comparemymobile.com have shown another indication of what can be interpreted as either a further decline for Apple, or just a representation of their high profile, depending on which way you look at it.

compare_my_mobile_logoThe study looks into the trends of trade-in for popular portable devices, and reveals that for last year, Apple products (iPhones, iPods, and iPads) represented 49% of all online trade-ins recorded by the UK site, taking into account 2 million transactions.

Filling out the leading places on the brand table were Apple’s leading smartphone rivals Samsung (responsible for 18.5% of trade-ins in the region for 2012), along with BlackBerry (12%), Nokia (8%), and HTC (5%).

For individual devices, it was found that Apple claimed two of the top five positions, with the iPhone 4 16GB model representing 17% of all products traded in, while the iPhone 3GS was responsible for a further 7%, with BlackBerry’s 8520 and Samsung’s Galaxy S and Galaxy S2 filling out the remainder of the main spaces.

A possible redeemable headline for Apple on the study, however, was that they are described as the ‘most valuable’ in the market, as the iPad lost just 8.7% in average cash value after a year when directly compared with the Samsung Galaxy Tab (devalued by 30% since 2011).

As a whole, comparemymobile state that an average price for a recycled technology product has been raised by 570% since 2007 (a natural effect of higher-quality products such as smartphones and tablets being produced), and by 31% on 2011.

With Apple responsible for almost half of this unwanted product drive, though, the earlier question can be repeated – is it a reflection of poor customer satisfaction (possibly a similar reason to why their trade-in value is so high), or does it just mean that Apple are so dominant that the natural order is to have 1 million UK products traded in over the course of a year? Whatever it is, at least all this recycling of their devices is good for their ‘green’ credentials

Leave a Reply